Dolly Parton Didn’t Let Elvis Sing “I Will Always Love You”

-Oh, my goodness! Dolly, I’m so thrilled to have you here. -Thank you! I have been looking so forward to being with you. -You look like a million dollars every single time. -Well, that’s about how much it costs. -Oh, good.

That’s the price tag on it. -Yeah. -This is such a cool project. Your songs — You’ve always been a great storyteller in your songs. And now you’ve adapted eight of the songs into teleplays that are going to be on Netflix. Is this an idea you’ve had for a long time, to make them more narrative? -Well, I’ve always loved to write story songs, and I always thought I’d love to see my songs up on-screen, and so, now, Netflix fell for it. -They fell for it, huh? -They fell for it.

And so, we did eight of them, and if they do good, we’ll continue. If not, it was a dream come true. And they’re all different.

And so, of course, you saw a little bit of Jolene there. -That was Jolene. -Julianne Hough did Jolene. She did a beautiful job of that. -And now, Jolene is a song — The inspiration for Jolene if I’m correct, was a bank teller? -Well, yeah, it was a girl that worked at the bank — I’ll tell the real story — when my husband and I first got married. And this beautiful girl was working at the bank.

She had everything I didn’t, like legs and stuff. You know, she was tall, beautiful. And he was just spending a lot of time down there. And I thought, “I know we ain’t got that kind of money.” -Yeah. -Not right now. So, he said he was down there, you know, working on — trying to get along, ’cause he was in asphalt paving at that time.http://www.10best-aussie-datingsites.com/top-10-dating-sites/senior

So he was trying to get a, you know, deal on that, and I said, “Look, you can talk to some of these men on that.” -Yeah. -Or you better get your butt to the house, or it’s going to be your ass and your wallet. So finally it was like — [ Laughter ] That was the setup for it. But Jolene, of course, became famous. -A giant famous song. And what would you do today if you ran into another Jolene with your husband? -Oh, with my husband?

I’d just hide his Viagra. -Oh, yeah. [ Laughter ] Lot easier now. Lot easier now. -It’s a lot easier now! [ Cheers and applause ] Actually, though, Jolene was quite the girl. I learned early on, though.

I didn’t want to feel jealous, ’cause everybody has those Jolenes in their life and kind of afraid of them. So I just thought, well, I’m just going to try to out-sexy them, you know, and just try to beat them. So, I’m 73 years old, and if you can beat that — -Yeah, exactly. [ Cheers and applause ] [ Both laugh ] -You know what? I don’t know how to tell you this, but I think — I think for most marriages, you’re the Jolene, just so you know. -Well, I don’t know. But I guess we all feel like there’s somebody better than us.

Your little boy loves that song, “Jolene.” -So, yeah, you were so kind. My 3-year-old loves “Jolene.” It’s his favorite song. And we FaceTimed with him in your dressing room. -We did! Do you guys know “Jolene”?

Let’s do a chorus of it for your little boy. What’s his name? -Yeah, for Ashe, please. Ashe. [ Cheers and applause ] -♪ Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene ♪ ♪ I’m begging of you, please don’t take my man ♪ This is for my gay crowd. ♪ Drag queen, drag queen, drag queen, drag queen ♪ [ Laughs ] ♪ Please don’t take him just because you can ♪ Okay. Thank you! -Oh, my gosh.

Thank you so much. [ Cheers and applause ] Now, I cannot believe that this is a true thing that if it was either on the same day or close to the same day, you wrote “Jolene” and “I Will Always Love You.” -You know, I found an old cassette, and I didn’t realize that myself. We were going through all my archives and trying to get everything on hard drives so I wouldn’t lose all these old tapes I had. And the same tape I had “Jolene” and “I Will Always Love You.” That was a major night. -I mean, that is unbelievable.

-Oh, my goodness! Dolly, I’m so thrilled to have you here. -Thank you! I have been looking so forward to being with you. -You look like a million dollars every single time. -Well, that’s about how much it costs. -Oh, good.

That’s the price tag on it. -Yeah. -This is such a cool project. Your songs — You’ve always been a great storyteller in your songs. And now you’ve adapted eight of the songs into teleplays that are going to be on Netflix. Is this an idea you’ve had for a long time, to make them more narrative? -Well, I’ve always loved to write story songs, and I always thought I’d love to see my songs up on-screen, and so, now, Netflix fell for it. -They fell for it, huh? -They fell for it.

And so, we did eight of them, and if they do good, we’ll continue. If not, it was a dream come true. And they’re all different.

And so, of course, you saw a little bit of Jolene there. -That was Jolene. -Julianne Hough did Jolene. She did a beautiful job of that. -And now, Jolene is a song — The inspiration for Jolene if I’m correct, was a bank teller? -Well, yeah, it was a girl that worked at the bank — I’ll tell the real story — when my husband and I first got married. And this beautiful girl was working at the bank.

She had everything I didn’t, like legs and stuff. You know, she was tall, beautiful. And he was just spending a lot of time down there. And I thought, “I know we ain’t got that kind of money.” -Yeah. -Not right now. So, he said he was down there, you know, working on — trying to get along, ’cause he was in asphalt paving at that time.

So he was trying to get a, you know, deal on that, and I said, “Look, you can talk to some of these men on that.” -Yeah. -Or you better get your butt to the house, or it’s going to be your ass and your wallet. So finally it was like — [ Laughter ] That was the setup for it. But Jolene, of course, became famous. -A giant famous song. And what would you do today if you ran into another Jolene with your husband? -Oh, with my husband?

I’d just hide his Viagra. -Oh, yeah. [ Laughter ] Lot easier now. Lot easier now. -It’s a lot easier now! [ Cheers and applause ] Actually, though, Jolene was quite the girl. I learned early on, though.

I didn’t want to feel jealous, ’cause everybody has those Jolenes in their life and kind of afraid of them. So I just thought, well, I’m just going to try to out-sexy them, you know, and just try to beat them. So, I’m 73 years old, and if you can beat that — -Yeah, exactly. [ Cheers and applause ] [ Both laugh ] -You know what? I don’t know how to tell you this, but I think — I think for most marriages, you’re the Jolene, just so you know. -Well, I don’t know. But I guess we all feel like there’s somebody better than us.

Your little boy loves that song, “Jolene.” -So, yeah, you were so kind. My 3-year-old loves “Jolene.” It’s his favorite song. And we FaceTimed with him in your dressing room. -We did! Do you guys know “Jolene”?

Let’s do a chorus of it for your little boy. What’s his name? -Yeah, for Ashe, please. Ashe. [ Cheers and applause ] -♪ Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene ♪ ♪ I’m begging of you, please don’t take my man ♪ This is for my gay crowd. ♪ Drag queen, drag queen, drag queen, drag queen ♪ [ Laughs ] ♪ Please don’t take him just because you can ♪ Okay. Thank you! -Oh, my gosh.

Thank you so much. [ Cheers and applause ] Now, I cannot believe that this is a true thing that if it was either on the same day or close to the same day, you wrote “Jolene” and “I Will Always Love You.” -You know, I found an old cassette, and I didn’t realize that myself. We were going through all my archives and trying to get everything on hard drives so I wouldn’t lose all these old tapes I had. And the same tape I had “Jolene” and “I Will Always Love You.” That was a major night. -I mean, that is unbelievable.

You were in the zone that night. -It could have been — It could’ve been, like, the first week or so, ’cause sometimes, when I write, I go back to the same cassette. -Of course. -But anyway, it’s very possible it was the same night, but it was during that same period of time. -That’s amazing. And now, Elvis Presley — True story — Elvis Presley heard that song and wanted to record it, which — and you said no. It must’ve been the hardest thing in the world to do. -You know, it was, and I still grieve over that, but it wasn’t Elvis.

He loved it, but Colonel Tom said that I had to give away half the publishing ’cause Elvis didn’t record anything unless he had half the publishing. -So that would mean that for perpetuity, he would own half of the song. -Yeah. And, oh, I said, “I couldn’t do it,” ’cause I was leaving that for my family. And so I just didn’t do it. And he didn’t do it.

And so after — After Whitney recorded it, I realized that that was the best choice. -Yeah, I mean, the fact that Whitney Houston did it. -I know. But I did write a song, though, later called “I Dreamed About Elvis,” and it’s really — I had an Elvis sound-alike sing with me on it. And we did sing “I Will Always Love You,” so maybe someday, I’ll put that out. -Okay, good, good.

So it came full circle. -And eventually, on the Netflix, if this goes on, I’ll do a movie about “I Will Always Love You,” too. -That would be wonderful to see.

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